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  • Jorge Eielson
Madrid, Spain
EIELSON quipucamayoc
6 Mar 2024 - 27 Apr 2024
Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Nodo sostenuto, 2001
Jorge Eielson, Piramide di Tessuti, 1970
Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, SP, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Ceremonia Ancestrale III, 1986
Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Untitled, 1980
Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Nodo, 2001
Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Untitled, n.d.
TRAVESIA CUATRO_EXPO_07_NARZO_2024_F7A5472

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, 'EIELSON quipucamayoc', installation view.

Travesía Cuatro Madrid, Spain, 06.03 – 27.04.2024.

Jorge Eielson, Quipus 48 Ri, 1973

1.- Today, the notion of shaman has been codified from the perspective of those peoples who preserve the memory and traditions of ancestral cultures. Therefore, according to social sciences, the shaman is the character who acts as a magician, healer, emissary of the gods or as someone with the ability to channel the forces of nature into his body and spirit, within a restricted and concrete environment. This idea —accepted in almost all academic circles today— holds that shamans inhabit the margins of civilization. However, if we decide to expand our concept or to be more lenient, the term can also refer to those magicians and emissaries who move in the very center of “civilization”. Within industrialized societies special figures who, in an unusual way are also shamans, have emerged. For example, if we accept that the term can be applied to eccentric creators such as German artist Joseph Beuys (1921-1986), then shamans exist and operate in various spaces of Modernity.

The term shaman comes from the Tungus languages (Siberia) and means “he who knows”. A shaman is thus a figure who makes predictions, healing practices, invocation to the gods and who, by having a special connection with nature, is usually a good advisor on behavior, and thus has the ability to modify reality or the perception of it. In the specific case of American cultures, shamans have been active members of the community since pre-Hispanic times, focusing mainly on rituals for harvesting and good weather omens.

2.- The poet and visual artist Jorge Eduardo Eielson (1924-2006) —a brilliant and multifaceted figure who was born in Peru and lived in several European countries— was a person who explored creativity and knowledge in an unorthodox way. His interest in universal culture, in avant-garde artistic expressions, and in the ancestral knowledge of Peru, opened up a new perspective for him. In this sense, his extended exile from his native land responded to a double purpose: to his desire to get closer to and nourish himself with international artistic production and, at the same time, to a need to draw inspiration from Peruvian culture.

With a restless and profound character, Eielson explored his intellectual gifts by nourishing himself with universal literature, European philosophy, as well as the scientific paradigms of the 19th and 20th centuries. At the same time, he opened space for spiritual search within Zen Buddhism. This multiple perspective made him become aware of reality and the world from his own experience as an exile and a nomad. But this is only a small expression of his versatility, since he found in poetry and art the last redoubt of an almost extinct humanism, a humanism that could be practiced in the margins of modern exhibitionism. Poetry was not a simple linguistic exercise or artistic practice for him but, in a more complex way, a place of political resistance —the last place from which one could be a legitimate shaman.

3.- These reflections on shamans and other enigmatic figures serve as a preamble to Eielson quipucamayoc exhibition at Travesía Cuatro Gallery, Madrid. With the purpose of celebrating the 100th anniversary of his birth, the exhibition will open its doors on March 5 and will cover essential aspects of his life and artistic practice. Under the critical eye of Patrick Charpenel, and with the support of the Centro Studi Jorge Eielson in Florence, the

exhibition will focus on three main nodes: ARCHIVE, where key objects and documents of his life will be displayed; CHAMANISM, which will reveal his vision on mythology and Peruvian civilization; and SUBLIME LOVE, which will address his complex and elusive sexuality. These three cores will review a small spectrum of his dislocated biography and will show how the artist was able to operate as an authentic quipucamayoc: a renewed and marginal knot-maker. In the ancient civilizations of Peru, the quipucamayoc were the mathematicians or accountants who kept the records of population and crop control, but also those responsible for recording stories and myths. They thus had the authority to handle information on administrative and narrative matters. The high status granted to these connoisseurs gave them the role of visionaries, authorized them to handle population and harvest data and, fundamentally, made them qualified hermeneuts to interpret the cosmos.

Eielson quipucamayoc covers important moments of this cultivated man who recovers the role of the Latin American shaman, who approaches fundamental stages of Peru’s visual culture, who reactivates the production of the South American quipu, who offers a new moral perspective to rethink the world. It seems that only a decentralized position —living outside his country of origin— could give him the objectivity to speak with authority about Peru. Jorge Eduardo Eielson is one of the most critical poets and artists of his country, and one of the figures who most question consumption societies. However, Eielson is not only a critic but also a healer who reestablishes the order of the cosmos, through the containment and release of that energy concentrated in a knot.

– Patrick Charpenel