• text
  • pictures
  • Jose Dávila
Guadalajara, Mexico
Jose Dávila & Project Room: Ana Prata
01 Feb 2020 - 30 May 2020
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
La soga a veces se revienta, 2020, Metal drums and ratchet strap, 174 x 89 x 159 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Toda fuerza es relativa, 2020, Rock, straps, and pulley, 344.8 x 118 x 103 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Boulder, wire, and bronze, 344.8 x 55.5 x 92 cm, Ed. 3 + 1 AP.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
El primer fuego, 2020, Metal beams, metal tray, and wood, Variable dimensions.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Utopía cero, 2020, Coal and metal cabinet, 190 x 120 x 90 cm.
Jose Dávila & Project Room: Ana Prata. 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, marble, acrylic sheets, rocks, boulders, metal, plaster, and glass spheres, Installation view.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, cardboard, and glass sphere, 154 x 43.7 x 28.5 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, 104.5 x 41 x 39.7 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, 104.5 x 41 x 39.7 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, plaster, metal, boulders, cardboard, and glass sphere, 145 x 78.2 x 82 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete and clay, 87 x 70 x 70 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete, plaster, and wood, 123 x 53.5 x 50 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete and boulders, 66 x 44 x 39 cm.
Jose Dávila (El primer fuego) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Metal, 50 x 50 x 50 cm.
Jose Dávila & Project Room: Ana Prata. 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Untitled, 2020, Concrete and enameled bricks, 120 x 44 x 44 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Teatro, 2020, Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Big small, 2020, Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Barco egípcio, 2019, Oil on canvas, 24x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Tapetinho, 2019, Oil and ballpoint pen ink on canvas, 24 x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Ofrenda, 2019, Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Galáxia I, 2019, Oil on fabric, 30 x 24 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Ana Prata, Galáxia II, 2020, Oil and acrylic on fabric, 40 x 30 cm.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.
Ana Prata (Ofrenda) 01 Feb 2020 – 18 Apr 2020.
Installation view.

El primer fuego

Jose Dávila

El primer fuego is an exhibition that replicates the material and relational ecosystem that has emerged at Jose Dávila’s studio throughout several years of constant and continuous production. Taking advantage of the geographical proximity between the studio and the exhibition space, the gallery has been transformed into a work space and functions as a reflection of the procedures that precede the consolidation of Dávila’s sculptural work.

The exhibition presents different moments that take place between the selection of raw materials and the conclusion of sculptural objects. This highlights the importance of the interrelation between objects which is channelized by the artist in order to generate structural systems of dependence. This sort of objectual reliance is characterized by the borrowing and exchange of qualities between contrasting materials in order to assure a certain degree of balance and permanence. The creation of these hybrid circuits implies a cyclical understanding of the transformation of matter. A fluctuating motion between self-preservation and disintegration.

The central piece within the exhibition represents a return to an early work by Dávila which was exhibited in 1999 at the Museo de las Artes de Guadalajara. The recreation of this work involves a small bonfire which is lighted intermittently inside the gallery space, the fire is surrounded by piles of logs witnessing the ignition process and awaiting as potential fuel. The metal tray that works as a platform for activating the bonfire operates as a liminal space where matter is forced to undergo a transformation process. Dávila’s minimal gesture presents fire as an autonomous symbol, referencing the notion of origin and the primitive; this sort of raw energy is able to reconfigure the reality of things and unveil the internal dynamics that are concealed within objects.

As a prelude, the bonfire is preceded by a couple of sculptures that work as mirrored counterweights. A raw stone is fastened to an industrial pulley which is fixed to the ceiling; this heavy object is faced by an apple made of bronze which remains suspended in the air. These two elements are part of Dávila’s recurring sculptural vocabulary; the apple is a recognizable reminder of the effects of the force of gravity. These compositional formats are continued in the next room where a group of metal barrels are affixed to the wall, making a pyramidal shape. The sequence of works generates a tangible rhythm that suggest the prevalence of a certain order. The ratchet straps, cables and chains that Dávila uses to connect objects function as forms of mediation and construct a structural itinerary. The trajectories between objects reconfigure the spatial experience of the gallery, dialoguing with its architectural disposition, modifying and dislocating the displacement dynamics that take place there.

The intuition of a certain order is interrupted abruptly by a chaotic accumulation of raw materials in the adjacent rooms. Concrete volumes, rocks, marble slabs, acrylic plates, fragments of wood and other construction materials occupy the entire room. This installation is a glance at the objects that inhabit the studio; and it is also a draft of Dávila’s work ethic that is characterized by the intuition of a series of possible interactions between objects. Since most of these objects are normally used as construction elements, these implies the suggestion of practical associations. Dávila does not reduces the interaction between objects to these practical terms, rather he is inclined to intertwine these elements through a poetic resonance that could attribute them with autonomy. The coexistence of these lithic bodies and industrial objects in the studio is what enables the appearance of these possible connections that are characterized to be more organic rather than an imposition from a predetermined conception of the sculptural. The circulation of these material presences in the exhibition culminates with a work that shows a tilted metallic cabinet being balanced out by a mound of coal. The relation between both objects arises as something mainly chromatic, adding a pictorial dimension to the sculptural object, but it also highlights the cyclic configuration of the whole exhibition: a circle that unfolds into itself towards infinity, intermittently raging from the human, constructed world to the unaltered configuration of raw matter.

 

Ofrenda

Ana Prata

Ofrenda (“Offering”) is the title chosen by the Brazilian artist Ana Prata for her exhibition in the Guadalajara space of Travesía Cuatro. She has converted the gallery’s Project Room into a small temple where a group of paintings are arranged around a mural made to present the gifts.  For the artist, painting can be understood as the materialization of a desire, as well as an offering, which is always a feeling materialized in an object. Her gifts are still lifes of fruits, bowls and trays that appear cut from the landscape. An interior landscape that is hardly insinuated as it is not used as a resource of reality or context, on the contrary, it confronts us with a lyrical and symbolic dialogue with the domestic.

These works are related to the modernist repertoire in a way that is neither reverential nor nostalgic, rather Prata seems to probe it as if she were an archaeologist, borrowing and distorting hieroglyphs to assimilate them into the conversation on contemporary painting. Among her references she quotes the Brazilian artists Tarsila do Amaral, her colorist figuration and radical modernity in terms of form, as well as Eleonore Koch and Alfredo Volpi, from whom she has inherited an apparently static spatial structure, even half empty, but which incorporates transparencies that give an atmospheric, solar and light effect. The result are optically dynamic images, a work that flirts with the decorative arts and graphism. With the use of bright and contradictory colors, whose beauty, which seems simple at first, hides a subtle complexity that breathes freshness, freedom and humor.