Guadalajara, Mexico
Guadalajara, Mexico
Curated by Andrés González
Tiger-Poems and Songs for Hurricanes
17 May 2018 - 04 Aug 2018
General installation view
Emiliano Yoshigei & Lucía Vidales installation view
Installation view Emiliano Yoshigei & Lucía Vidales
Lucía Vidales & Leidy Churchman installation view
General installation view
Rafael Uriegas installation view
Rafael Uriegas installation view
Rafael Uriegas installation view
Rafael Uriegas installation view
Emiliano Yoshigei y Enrique Lanz installation view
General installation view
General installation view
General installation view
Trevor Shimizu y Emiliano Yoshigei installation view
Trevor Shimizu y Alejandra Noel installation view
General installation view
General installation view
General installation view
General installation view
Installation view
Installation view
General installation view
Alexandra Noel installation view
Emily Sundblad y Alexandra Noel installation view
Leidy Churchman, Emiliano Yoshigei G. N., Enrique Lanz, Alexandra Noel, Genesis P-Orridge, Gabriel Rosas Alemán, Trevor Shimizu, Emily Sundblad, Rafael Uriegas, Lucía Vidales.

 

Curated by Andrés González

This exhibition is about the possibility of new realisms. Or maybe it’s about the failure of realism and the inception of a new way of using painting as a representational tool. Well, it’s not actually “new”. But it has been revisited- reshaped-reframed. I don’t think this is an aesthetic style, but rather a mindset. And what this exhibition deals with is the distance between the mindset and the representation of this self-imposed “perspective” within the pictorial realm. The contemporary world is hard to look at, even more difficult to comprehend! Reality seems to be constituted of an acidic liquid that burns our hands when we try to grasp it and see through the transparencies and brief glimmers. Violent & fluid ambiguity.

Henri Rousseau was harshly criticized by the French press during his first exhibitions, his painting style was called pre-primitive. The pre-primitive realm is populated by children, animals and non-western cultures. If this so called pre- primitivism allows us to shake the foundations of our epistemological pride, then this “perspective” is a valuable one, that should be re-activated constantly in times of visual overconfidence.

Innocence and naiveté are powerful tools that can respond to the cartoonish usage of theory and criticism nowadays. A subtle demand for a new rigor, new perspectives on intimacy, and a plea for a more humble notion of humanity (trying to deflate the rationalistic pride of modernity, irremediably present to in art- making in recent years).

Madrid, Spain
Madrid, Spain
UPCOMING SHOW
Jose Dávila
12 Sep 2018 - 10 Nov 2018

TRAVESÍA CUATRO presents Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost, the new solo exhibition by Jose Dávila, from September 12th until the end of November 2018. In addition to this and on the occasion of Apertura Madrid Gallery Weekend, Travesía Cuatro will present an installation of sculptures by the artist at Madrid’s Royal Bota- nical Garden from September 12th to 16th.

Both exhibitions will present a parallel research by the artist regarding sculptural language and the visual heri- tage of modernism.

At Madrid’s Royal Botanical Garden Jose Dávila will construct an accumulative glyptotheque that summarizes both materially and formally the recurring elements that can be found throughout the history of sculpture. In the same way that William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin used the cut-up technique in order to produce new written works with cropped and re-arranged text, Dávila develops a similar procedure by creating these vertical compositions that merge organic and industrial materials, minimal and classical elements, found objects, and construction materials with evident references to architecture.

The exhibition at Travesía Cuatro will bring together a large group of graphic works; these paintings question the inherent referentiality of text and the representative capacity of visual elements. In these works a series of written descriptions of prehistoric art are interrupted and contradicted by abstract figures that are reminiscent to modernist art. These works are halfway between visual memory that remits the spectator to certain artists and ways of looking at art, and the concrete capacity of language to emulate and conduct human perception in the most basic level.